Pulled over for being “uppity”

Dayton Police, combating direct eye contact since 1796.

In Dayton, Ohio, last week a black motorist was pulled over by a white police officer because, as the cop is heard saying on video,

You made direct eye contact with me and held onto it when I was passing you.

Where I grew up, in a small, rural town in central Florida, there was a word that got applied to blacks who didn’t know their place. That word was “uppity,” and was usually followed by another word, starting with the letter “N”.

Now you may argue that uppity is just a word meaning snobbish. But no, uppity, in this context, is racist. Don’t take my word for it. The second-most popular definition at Urban Dictionary lays it out.

Word used by racist old white Southerners to refer to any black person who looks them in the eye. Usually followed by [N-word]. “That uppity [N-word] is not working in the cotton field like he should be.”

Scott Walker has a message for the world

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Scott Walker leaves the Citadel after his first major foreign policy speech last Friday.

 

Scott Walker was down in South Carolina last week to give a major speech on foreign policy, an area in which his credentials have been questioned. To be fair, this is nothing new. After all, what governor can claim any real meaningful expertise when it comes to foreign relations?

Ok, besides Sarah Palin and that view of Russia from her front porch. Or G.W. Bush with all that Mexico right next door.

Anyway, while Walker’s speech before an audience of cadets at the Citadel (all members of the military academy’s Republican Society, by the way) was a little light on actual policy specifics, he did deploy the rhetorical heavy artillery:

As president, I will send the following message: The retreat is over. American leadership is back. American leadership is back and, together with our allies, we will not surrender another inch of ground to terrorists or any other power that threatens our safety.

America will not be intimidated. And neither will I.

He continued:

Are we safer now than we were seven years ago? Anyone who believes the answer to that question is yes should vote for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Sadly, I believe the answer is no, America is not safer. Since Secretary Clinton took charge of our nation’s diplomacy, we’ve abandoned American leadership in the world, forgotten that America is an exceptional country, and lost faith in America’s ability to influence world events.

Stirring words for sure. But it turns out that the version of the speech that Walker, famous for speaking without the aid of a teleprompter, delivered was very different from the prepared draft of his remarks. As luck would have it, I came across the original text.

So, in the interests of no-retreat, won’t-be-intimidated, world-influencing, exceptional leadership, I want to share with you the original. Conveniently set to music …

“That ain’t my culture and heritage!”

Pay no attention to the unbiblical dinosaur behind Georgia State Sen. Josh McKoon.
Pay no attention to the unbiblical dinosaur behind Georgia State Sen. Josh McKoon.

The champion of Georgia’s “religious liberty” bill, Republican State Sen. Josh McKoon, has come clean on the real purpose of the legislation that is currently stalled in the state legislature.

As Slate explains, when moderate Republicans proposed an amendment to the bill that would expressly clarify that it was not intended to legalize discrimination against LGBT Georgians,

McKoon let the façade drop. “That amendment,” he fumed, “would completely undercut the purpose of the bill.”

In a loving homage to the good old days of the struggle against civil rights for African Americans, McKoon blames opposition to the bill on a group of outside agitators that the rest of us would recognize as the bedrock pillars of the state’s corporate community. You know, troublemakers like Delta Airlines, Coca-Cola, and Home Depot.

We’ve had this problem because very large multi-national corporations that are headquartered in this state – their executives, many of whom are not from Georgia, have different values than you and I do. They think that their cultural norms, their liberal, far-left cultural norms, should be applied to our state.

In short, those goddam Yankee liberal do-gooders with their corporate dollars just don’t fit in with the cherished culture and heritage of the great state of Georgia.

You know, I think McKoon ought to let Homer T. Stokes explain from here.

They had never gone away

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Four sets of quotes spanning 16 years on the Provisional IRA and its ceasefire. In each case emphasis has been added by me.

After the July 1999 murder of Belfast taxi driver and low-level police informer Charles Bennett:

The official response to his murder, delivered on Thursday by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Mo Mowlam, has thrown a shadow over the peace process. Almost in the same breath, she declared that “there is no doubt that the IRA were involved in the Bennett murder” and that there is “not a sufficient basis to conclude that the IRA ceasefire has broken down.” — (Irish Independent)

The ceasefire relates to attacks against the British state, but the IRA retains the right to deal with matters in its own community, said a republican source. “That includes taking action against informers, carrying out `punishment’ attacks, and `policing’ dissidents if need be.” — (Irish Times)


 

At the sentencing in 2010 of Harry Fitzsimmons, convicted of the 2004 abduction of dissident Bobby Tohill from Kelly’s Cellars pub in Belfast City Centre:

Belfast Crown Court was told the attack in February 2004 was meant as a message to Tohill not to oppose the then fledgling peace process.

Jailing Fitzsimmons for what he described as a violent preplanned attack, Belfast Crown Court judge Lord Justice Girvan said it was “ironic” the Provisionals should, in the so-called interests of peace, use violence and intimidation to secure their ends. — (BBC)


 

In response to reported threats against the life of senior Belfast Republican Seamus Finucane by the armed dissident group Oglaigh na hEireann:

All sorts of thin lines were being walked. One source, commenting on the likely implications of any attack on Seamus Finucane, or any other mainstream republican figure, commented: “They [the dissidents] would be swatted like flies.” And that comment tells you that the IRA could be resurrected. … What would happen if they attacked a senior republican? They know the answer to that question. “The gear [guns] would be out,” one of them told me. — (Belfast Telegraph)


 

After the murder two weeks ago of former IRA man Kevin McGuigan in apparent retaliation for the May killing of former senior IRA member Gerard Davison:

One of our major lines of enquiry is that members of the Provisional IRA were involved in this murder. I have no information to say at this stage whether this was sanctioned at a command level or not and I am not prepared to speculate about that. — (PSNI Detective Superintendent Kevin Geddes)

Individual members cooperated in shooting dead Kevin McGuigan in East Belfast but organisational structures have brought members of the outlawed organisation along the path of peace, Police Service of Northern Ireland Chief Constable George Hamilton said.

Mr Hamilton said: “They are not on a war footing, they are not involved in paramilitary activity in the sense that they were during part of the conflict.” — (RTE News)

Reacting to Mr Hamilton’s view, [Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa] Villiers said: “It didn’t come as a surprise to me. My understanding is, very much in line with that of the chief constable, that a number of the organisational structures of the Provisional IRA still exist but that there is no evidence it’s involved in terrorism or paramilitary activity.” — (Belfast Telegraph)

But if you listened to Bobby Storey back in June 2014, you knew all this already.

We have a message for the British Government, for the Irish Government, for the cabal that is out there: we haven’t gone away, you know. — (Belfast Telegraph)